Planning by @Mjburnage

Name: Matt
Twitter name: Mjburnage
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): History
Position: Teacher
What is your advice about? Planning

  1. Simplicity is under-rated. Complex lessons aren’t necessarily good.
  2. Focusing on what is learnt is more valuable than focusing on how it isn taught. Being clear about the content of your lesson(s) is key.
  3. Don’t be afraid to spend more time on something if it appears students are struggling with it.
  4. Focusing on the scheme of work/curriculum is more valuable than focusing on individual lessons.
  5. Be clear on the conceptual thinking you want students to do. If you dont get it, students probably won’t.

Routines for the start of every lesson by @rufuswilliam

Name: Rufus
Twitter name: @rufuswilliam
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Maths
Position: Teaching and Learning
What is your advice about? Routines for the start of every lesson

  1. Start every lesson with a recap quiz. Have this already on the board for them to immediately do when they come into the classroom.
  2. Greet the students at the door, I do this with a handshake. Be warm and reinforce expectations such as respect and hard work.
  3. Get all your classes to practice the routine of coming into your class. Mine has three steps: walk to your chair and sit down, get your equipment and book out, start the work.
  4. Students self-mark the quiz. After this, get the students to put their pens down and listen as you remind them about your expectations for their behaviour.
  5. Make sure you explain the reasons for the behaviour routines and expectations. Mine are basically: I want them to be in an environment where they can do their best.

How to remember to go on break duty by @JamesTheo

Name: James Theobald
Twitter name: @JamesTheo
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: Teacher
What is your advice about? How to remember to go on break duty

  1. Note to self: Remember to go out break duty
  2. Gentle reminder: Remember to go out on break duty
  3. Don’t forget: Remember to go out on break duty
  4. NOT LONG NOW: REMEMBER TO GO ON BREAK DUTY!
  5. Ah, break time. Why not sit down and have a cup of tea… shit.

Using gained time (if you’re lucky enough to have it) by @bexn91

Name: Rebecca Nobes
Twitter name: bexn91
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): MFL
Position: Second in Department
What is your advice about? Using gained time (if you’re lucky enough to have it)

  1. Be realistic – don’t think you’re suddenly going to be able to change the world. Think about the time you have and what you will be able to achieve.
  2. Don’t waste time – be clear about exactly what you want to do and try to stick to that plan. Not everyone gets gained time so make the most of it.
  3. Have a target in mind – Maybe there is an area of your subject knowledge you want to work on, or a scheme of work to update. Could you prepare resources to share with others?
  4. Try not to use it as extra PPA – personally I feel gained time is wasted if I just keep planning and marking as usual. I want to see results of the time I’ve had.
  5. Don’t put pressure on yourself – this is gained time after all. Get done what you need to, but don’t worry if it doesn’t all happen.

Writing a job application by @shinpad1

Name: Sinead
Twitter name: @shinpad1
Sector: Primary
Subject taught (if applicable):
Position: Deputy and class teacher
What is your advice about? Writing a job application

  1. Write your application tailored to the school you’re applying to. Don’t use the same unchanged personal statement for every job. It’s unimpressive and a bit insulting.
  2. Give real examples of what you’ve done in your classroom(s) on training. It shouldn’t sound like you’ve once read a book about teaching; your aim is to give genuine examples.
  3. It is good to have ambitious aims for your 1st job so by all means describe inspiring children, but also discuss real progress yr pupils have made & things you’ve taught them
  4. Paying attention to the job spec is a bit like reading exam questions carefully. Tailor your application to the things the school want; otherwise you’ll lose marks (really).
  5. Sound like you are looking forward to becoming a real teacher because, honestly, if you can’t muster the energy to write a good application, you don’t have the energy to teach

Behaviour, their first impressions by @AntSchmitt

Name: Anthony Smith
Twitter name: @AntSchmitt
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: 2nd in Dept
What is your advice about? Behaviour, their first impressions.

  1. Children, as we all do, will make a judgement about what kind of teacher you will be within the first few moments of watching you in the classroom.
  2. Nearly all children change their behavaiour as a result of who they preceive you to be, if you seem strict, they’ll assume you are, and then behave better.
  3. If kids are uncertain about what kind of teacher you are, a few will test you with challenging behaviour; to see if you’ll do what they can’t: exercise control.
  4. Be very aware of how you feel when a child challenges you, children can be keenly aware of teachers’ feelings and use them to manipulate, control and provoke.
  5. Acknowledge, praise and reward: they’re different actions with different effects, make sure you understand and use them appropriately.

How to enjoy being a teacher by @ENG_MrWalker

Name: Chris Walker
Twitter name: @ENG_MrWalker
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: KS3 Coordinator
What is your advice about? How to enjoy being a teacher

  1. Get to know your students. Ask them about their hobbies, their interests.
  2. Teach texts that you like. Share articles and texts that you enjoy and it will make you more passionate about them.
  3. Regular marking. Heavy duty nights of marking can lead to resentment of your job – stay on top of marking and it will free you up for more fun things.
  4. Don’t bury your head in the sand. Confront that difficult pupil and ask colleagues for support – they’re rarely mean to you and an angel for everyone else.
  5. Take a risk. Try something new in your lesson be bold, be brave and reflect.

Job application preparation by @ShropshireSBM

Name: Hayley Dunn
Twitter name: @ShropshireSBM
Sector: Primary
Subject taught (if applicable):
Position: Finance Director
What is your advice about? Job application preparation

  1. Make sure that you visit the school for a tour, ideally in advance of drafting your application form; and ask pertinent questions about the school, staff, pupils, families, etc learn as much as you can. Often there will be a date on the job advert for opportunities to view the school, if there isn’t ask for one.
  2. The personal statement part of the application form is your opportunity to showcase you, pay this particular attention.
  3. Always ask someone else to proof read your application form.
  4. Outline in your application why you want to work for this particular school and this particular role.
  5. A recruitment process is a two way thing, check your values are aligned. It is as much about you working out if the school is definitely one that you want to work for, as it is about them finding out if you are the best person for them.

Managing your workload as a trainee by @mikeselig

Name: M. Selig
Twitter name: @mikeselig
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Maths
Position: NQT
What is your advice about? Managing your workload as a trainee

  1. Timetable your to do list. Don’t just have an endless list of things you have to do, prioritise it and then set aside specific times to do the most important.
  2. Find a balance and set boundaries (and stick to them). Make time for yourself, otherwise you won’t survive.
  3. You are not alone. Ask for help if you are unsure of something or are struggling; if you don’t ask, people will assume you are fine.
  4. Mark and feedback smartly. All your feedback and marking should help you (planning) and your students; if it’s not then do it differently (or don’t do it).
  5. Don’t work on Friday evenings. Go to the pub (if that’s your thing) or go shopping or whatever; just don’t work.

Tips for using a Visualiser or Document Camera (mainly for English) by @teach_smith

Name: Dan Smith
Twitter name: @teach_smith
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: Teacher
What is your advice about? Tips for using a Visualiser or Document Camera (mainly for English)

  1. Put a text under the camera & and annotate with the class.
  2. Select a model piece of work & put under the camera for the class to discuss.
  3. Select a piece of work & mark it under the camera with the class.
  4. Show the same piece of work in different stages of editing/drafting throughout a lesson or lessons
  5. Place two pieces of student work or comparison texts under the camera and compare with the class.