Daily Mile in the EYFS…so much more than exercise. by @MadeUpTeacher1

Name: MadeUpTeacher
Twitter name: @MadeUpTeacher1
Sector: Early Years, Primary
Subject taught (if applicable): EYFS Curriculum
Position: EYFS Leader SLT
What is your advice about? Daily Mile in the EYFS…so much more than exercise.

  1. Walk briskly with stops to teach or allow others to catch up. Go out dressed appropriately whatever the weather and change your lead pair daily so you get to chat with everyone in the class regularly.
  2. There is no better way to learn the knowledge and vocabulary of the seasonal cycle than a daily mile in your local park. It’s a real-time, rich and meaningful experience.
  3. Classification can be taught year round.
  4. The mile can begin/end with book time or just a minute or two listening to birds or the wind in the trees.
  5. Daily Mile builds in a slice of regular exercise that sets the foundations for healthy living. Children can learn about road safety and the geography of their local areas too.
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Teaching “Literacy” in subjects other than English by @davowillz

Name: David Williams
Twitter name: @davowillz
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: KS4 English Coordinator
What is your advice about? Teaching “Literacy” in subjects other than English.

  1. Teach your subject well. Really – it’s what you’re good at.
  2. Identify what pupils need to be better at in your subject in terms of reading, writing, speaking and listening. Seek advice if unsure, but one thing to improve is ideal.
  3. Teach pupils what they need to know to improve and find lots of opportunities for practice.
  4. DO NOT shoe horn in anything that is unnatural to your subject as that sort of thing will soon be abandoned.
  5. Test your teaching has been effective and tweak your approach if necessary.

Starting out in TEFL in Germany by @grumpyteacher17

Name: The Grumpy Teacher
Twitter name: @grumpyteacher17
Sector: EFL
Subject taught (if applicable):
Position: Teacher
What is your advice about? Starting out in TEFL in Germany

  1. Do a qualification. You can get TEFL work without one but it’s a very useful experience: just be sceptical of the underlying ideology.
  2. Learn enough of the language that you can give instructions in German if necessary.
  3. Wear a suit. Yes, you’ll probably be the only one, so Germans don’t expect it, but it does help with your credibility.
  4. The conventional wisdom is that lots of time should be devoted to ‘production’ tasks focussed on ‘fluency’. Unless the students are at a very high level already, this is unrealistic; fortunately it’s also unnecessary.
  5. Tell ’em they’re wrong all the time. They’ll appreciate it, and you, much more than if you let things go because the meaning is clear: your students want to get it right and they want you to help them get it right.

Being Ill by @MsSFax

Name: Sarah Barker
Twitter name: @MsSFax
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: Head of Faculty
What is your advice about? Being Ill

  1. Don’t come to work when you’re ill; you’ll spread your illness and do a substandard job anyway.
  2. Nobody – literally nobody – is indispensable. Don’t worry about being off if you’re ill; the school will still be running when you return.
  3. Follow your school’s procedure for calling in sick. Make sure you let your line-manager know, even if this isn’t part of the official procedure.
  4. While you’re ill, don’t post on social media, get filmed dancing on the stage at a festival, or return to work with a cake that you made while you were off.
  5. It is possible that you’ll have a return to work meeting when you get back. Aim for transparency in this meeting and use the opportunity to discuss any concerns you have about returning.

Teaching Spelling to a whole class in secondary school. by @davowillz

Name: David Williams
Twitter name: @davowillz
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: KS4 English Coordinator
What is your advice about? Teaching Spelling to a whole class in secondary school.

  1. Give pupils a standardised spelling test in Y7 to screen for significant difficulties. Repeat this test at the end of term to check for progress.
  2. Identify a sound that some pupils are getting wrong (ie in believe for example. Get pupils to write out all or lots of words with the same sound and spelling (field thief relieve believe etc).
  3. Model sounding out aloud and writing these words (beware schwa). Then get pupils to do this themselves.
  4. Quiz pupils on this list at random over the next few lessons. Repeat sounding out and writing if necessary.
  5. Teach words with the same sound but different spelling at an entirely different time to avoid confusion.

Students with EHC Plans by @whitebug16

Name: Maz
Twitter name: whitebug16
Sector: Primary, Secondary, Special School
Subject taught (if applicable):
Position: SENCO
What is your advice about? Students with EHC Plans

  1. Be aware of the contents of the plan. Ask to read it if necessary
  2. Find out how best to support the student to succeed in your subject
  3. Don’t just leave it to the TA!
  4. Be aware of long/short term targets, and how you are helping the student to meet them
  5. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Contact parents to ask for advice if necessary

Who to Get on the Right Side of by @ThisIsLiamM

Name: Liam
Twitter name: @ThisIsLiamM
Sector: Primary
Subject taught (if applicable):
Position: Assistant Head
What is your advice about? Who to Get on the Right Side of

  1. Kitchen – Smile, be polite, ask how they are. You may get extra food.
  2. Site agent – When you leave, turn off lights and close windows. Offer to help if he/she is shifting something.
  3. Office – Don’t only go in when you need something. Do your register on time.
  4. Lunchtime supervisors – Step in and help them out if they need it.
  5. Everyone – Smile. Say hello. Hold doors. Ask how their families are. Just, you know, be nice!