Teaching Spelling to a whole class in secondary school. by @davowillz

Name: David Williams
Twitter name: @davowillz
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: KS4 English Coordinator
What is your advice about? Teaching Spelling to a whole class in secondary school.

  1. Give pupils a standardised spelling test in Y7 to screen for significant difficulties. Repeat this test at the end of term to check for progress.
  2. Identify a sound that some pupils are getting wrong (ie in believe for example. Get pupils to write out all or lots of words with the same sound and spelling (field thief relieve believe etc).
  3. Model sounding out aloud and writing these words (beware schwa). Then get pupils to do this themselves.
  4. Quiz pupils on this list at random over the next few lessons. Repeat sounding out and writing if necessary.
  5. Teach words with the same sound but different spelling at an entirely different time to avoid confusion.
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Top 5 books that an English NQT should read by @teach_smith

Name: Daniel Smith
Twitter name: @teach_smith
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: Teacher
What is your advice about? Top 5 books that an English NQT should read

  1. Making Every English Lesson Count
  2. Reading Reconsidered
  3. The Writing Revolution
  4. Elements of Eloquence
  5. Shakespeare on Toast

Five art terms for a sophisticated discussion of literature by @JamesTheo

Name: James Theobald
Twitter name: JamesTheo
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: Teacher
What is your advice about? Five art terms for a sophisticated discussion of literature

  1. Mimesis: representation or imitation of the real world in art and literature. “The witches’ prophecy that Banquo “shalt get kings” is mimetic: James I is a descendent of the real Banquo.”
  2. Ekphrasis: a description of a work of art, either real or imagined. “The opening of Browning’s poem, ‘My Last Duchess’, is ekphrastic – the poet details how the artist has expertly depicted the duchess’ features.”
  3. Chiaroscuro: the juxtaposition of light and dark. “Stevenson’s clever use of chiaroscuro emphasises the sudden change of mood as the ‘brilliantly lit’ moon is at once annihilated by the ‘fog roll[ing] over the city’.”
  4. Caricature: the depiction of a person or thing using magnification or exaggeration of its characteristics for satirical, comic or grotesque effect. “In ‘Animal Farm’, Orwell caricatures with unfailing accuracy the machinations of Soviet propaganda…”
  5. Baroque: highly ornate or extravagant in style. “Shakespeare combines baroque language with mispronunciation to highlight Bottom’s pretentiousness: the character sees himself as a ‘lofty’ performer who ‘will move storms’ and ‘ask some tears’, yet he mispronounces the title character as ‘Thisne’.”