Setting cover by @dukkhaboy

Name: Philip Anderson
Twitter name: dukkhaboy
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Geography
Position: Head of department
What is your advice about? Setting cover

  1. keep instructions simple
  2. refer to questions in a text book or a previously used and trusted worksheet
  3. don’t rely on technology
  4. set more work than could possible be done in twice the time
  5. leave instructions on who shouldn’t sit next to whom or a seating plan if you can

Marking by @heymissprice

Name: Emma Price
Twitter name: @heymissprice
Sector: Primary
Subject taught (if applicable):
Position: Y6 teacher
What is your advice about? Marking

  1. Never take books home to mark.
  2. Live-mark maths or mark as a class then scan books for next steps. There’s no value in you ticking endless calculations.
  3. Plan extended pieces of writing around other workload. If you’re hugely overloaded, don’t write too much on that day!
  4. Shut your door after school and mark. Don’t get drawn into chit-chat which distracts you from getting your marking finished.
  5. Plan your marking schedule into your week; use free periods/PPA or half of lunch to get a head start.

Formative Assessment by @mrgraymath

Name: Lee
Twitter name: @mrgraymath
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Mathematics
Position: Principal Teacher
What is your advice about? Formative Assessment

  1. Assess the essential prerequisite skills for your lesson (starter, multi-choice quiz, class discussion, etc.) Address any issues uncovered first rather than building on foundations of sand.
  2. Don’t just plan the questions you’ll use to assess learning, plan for the likely misconceptions and how you’ll address them.
  3. Get in amongst them as they work; mark jotters, probe understanding, give feedback.
  4. If an assessment is simply to confirm that which you already know, it’s probably not worthwhile.
  5. Beware confusing short-term performance with long-term learning.

Teaching coursework by @CorbittKirsty

Name: Kirsty Corbitt
Twitter name: CorbittKirsty
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Health and Social Care
Position: Head of Dept and Head of House
What is your advice about? Teaching coursework

  1. Model exactly what good looks like.
  2. Teach content in small sections and then allow practice time to embed
  3. Scaffold from basics to complex
  4. Don’t make all students work at the same speed, hard to do but very effective.
  5. Allow independence once the basic content and model is in place to produce work unique to the student.

New Ideas by @susansenglish

Name: Susan Strachan
Twitter name: @susansenglish
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: KS4 Leader of Learning
What is your advice about? New Ideas

  1. Think carefully about the impact on you (or staff) before implementing.
  2. Think carefully about the impact on students before implementing.
  3. Allow your common sense to rule (so as not to implement something without careful thought).
  4. Make sure ‘the idea’ is a manageable expectation for you and for your students.
  5. Don’t over complicate ideas, therefore keep it simple.

How to actually enjoy a sports/athletics carnival by @mikesalter74

Name: Michael Salter
Twitter name: mikesalter74
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Latin, French, Greek, German
Position: Teacher
What is your advice about? How to actually enjoy a sports/athletics carnival

  1. Remember that it only happens once a year.
  2. Devise some random, geeky games to play with your stopwatch.
  3. Secure some time on the loudspeaker, during which you can make disparaging comments about your colleagues’ dress sense on the day.
  4. Gravitate towards like-minded colleagues throughout, no matter where you’ve been “assigned”.
  5. Bring your own lunch. Canteens at sports venues are hell on earth.

Planning by @smanfarr

Name: Sam Williams
Twitter name: @smanfarr
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: Assistant Head
What is your advice about? Planning

  1. Plan for impact and not just activities to do.
  2. Spend time planning what matters e.g. Your questioning is more important that how a presentation looks.
  3. Don’t plan in isolation- other people’s ideas / experience can really help.
  4. Planning is part of the process and should be informed by how well students were able to access/ complete the work set.
  5. Plan to take time off! Rest is important too!

The benefits of using blank slides by @rufuswilliam

Name: Rufus
Twitter name: @rufuswilliam
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Maths
Position: Lead Coach
What is your advice about? The benefits of using blank slides

  1. A key question to ask oneself as a teacher is ‘where should the attention of my students be now?’
  2. Whatever presentation tool you use, there are benefits to having things written on it during the lesson. For example, I start my lessons with a ‘Do Now’ on the board for students to do immediately as they come into the room.
  3. There are many parts of the lesson where what is written on the board is not useful and can become a hindrance to learning. For example, when I want the students to be concentrating on what I’m saying, I don’t want them to be distracted by what is still on the board.
  4. Turning the interactive whiteboard off and rubbing off what’s written on the whiteboard are good strategies to focus the attention of students on one’s explanations. When using presentation tools, I’ve found the best strategy is to use a blank slide when I want the attention on me.
  5. This should not be confused with dual coding. Dual coding is when you use a pictorial representation to augment an explanation. If this is done well then a slide with this picture can be good during an explanation.

Using mini white boards by @cjshore

Name: Chris Shore
Twitter name: @cjshore
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Maths
Position: Director of Maths
What is your advice about? Using mini white boards

  1. Check you have enough boards, working pens and erasers before the lesson. Note: tissues make fine erasers if you are short.
  2. Check the boards are clean and free from swear words etc. This can be done as you give them out.
  3. Establish routines and stick to them. Decide before hand who will give the equipment out, what doodling you will tolerate etc.
  4. Tell students beforehand of your expectations for no penis drawings and no swear words written on the back of the board. Saying at the start minimises the chance they will appear later on.
  5. When the boards are packed away, make sure it is you who collects them in so that you can check they are all clean in readiness for the next teacher.

Managing workload by @steelemaths

Name: Jason Steele
Twitter name: @steelemaths
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Maths
Position: Lead Practioner
What is your advice about? Managing workload

  1. Plan for learning not individual lessons. Start at the end and plan how you will sequence your lessons.
  2. Get a 2 week timetable on A4. Give an overview of your lessons, but also plan in what you’ll be doing in PPA and afterschool.
  3. Find a time when you work best (morning/evening), and use this time effectively.
  4. If something isn’t going to have an effect on teaching or learning, question, is it worth the time?
  5. Don’t reinvent the wheel, leave your ego at the door. Plenty of good free resources out there, find what works for you.