Avoiding EduMyths by @greg_ashman

Name: Greg Ashman
Twitter: @greg_ashman
Sector:  Secondary
Subject: Maths and Physics
Position: Head of Maths
5 Bits of Advice About:  Avoiding EduMyths

  1. Just because they told you it was true when your were training, it doesn’t mean that it is. Training colleges perpetuate all sorts of EduMyths.
  2. Learning styles and brain gym are just the most *well known* examples of EduMyths.
  3. A scientific theory is something that has been rigorously tested by experiment. An education theory is often just what someone reckons.
  4. If you challenge EduMyths then be prepared for people going on about ‘ontology’, ‘post-structuralism’ and stuff like that. This can mostly be disregarded.
  5. Read a myth-busting blog like mine!
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Behaviour in Tough Schools by @greg_ashman

Name: Greg Ashman
Twitter name: @greg_ashman
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Maths/Science
Position: Teacher / Head of Maths / Head of Research
What is your advice about? Behaviour in tough schools

1: Poor behaviour can wreck NQTs. If a school doesn’t have a clear behaviour policy then don’t accept a job or leave if you’re already there.

2: Always use a seating plan. Even if nobody else does.

3: Ask a colleague for incidents that have happened and imagine what you would do in that situation. This helps you make quick decisions and highlights what you don’t know.

4: Put these scenarios as hypotheticals to senior staff. Follow sensible advice but if they suggest these scenarios won’t happen if you plan good lessons then leave.

5: Keep detailed records because there will be a lot to track. It also helps when people claim you haven’t followed something up properly.

Cognitive Load Theory by @greg_ashman

Name: Greg Ashman
Twitter name: @greg_ashman
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable):
Position: Teacher / Head of Maths / Head of Research
What is your advice about? Cognitive Load Theory

1: Explicit teaching is more effective than inquiry learning, problem based learning, project based learning and similar approaches when we want students to learn something new.

2: Good explicit teaching is highly interactive because this ensures attention.

3: Worked examples are effective and have been well researched.

4: Consider presenting a worked example and then asking students to complete an almost identical example themselves, rather than presenting several worked examples in a row.

5: “Worked Examples” are not restricted to maths. The same effect has been seen with an annotated Shakespeare play.