Managing your workload as a trainee by @mikeselig

Name: M. Selig
Twitter name: @mikeselig
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Maths
Position: NQT
What is your advice about? Managing your workload as a trainee

  1. Timetable your to do list. Don’t just have an endless list of things you have to do, prioritise it and then set aside specific times to do the most important.
  2. Find a balance and set boundaries (and stick to them). Make time for yourself, otherwise you won’t survive.
  3. You are not alone. Ask for help if you are unsure of something or are struggling; if you don’t ask, people will assume you are fine.
  4. Mark and feedback smartly. All your feedback and marking should help you (planning) and your students; if it’s not then do it differently (or don’t do it).
  5. Don’t work on Friday evenings. Go to the pub (if that’s your thing) or go shopping or whatever; just don’t work.

Tips for using a Visualiser or Document Camera (mainly for English) by @teach_smith

Name: Dan Smith
Twitter name: @teach_smith
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: Teacher
What is your advice about? Tips for using a Visualiser or Document Camera (mainly for English)

  1. Put a text under the camera & and annotate with the class.
  2. Select a model piece of work & put under the camera for the class to discuss.
  3. Select a piece of work & mark it under the camera with the class.
  4. Show the same piece of work in different stages of editing/drafting throughout a lesson or lessons
  5. Place two pieces of student work or comparison texts under the camera and compare with the class.

Using TFL to commute for the first time by @AndyLewis_RE

Name: Andy Lewis
Twitter name: AndyLewis_RE
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): RE
Position: Assistant Headteacher / Director of RS
What is your advice about? Using TFL to commute for the first time

  1. Let seasoned commuters guide you to where the doors will be; join their small platform huddles. It’s all about ‘strategy’ in stations.
  2. It’s unlikely you will get a seat in order to do marking. Get a kindle or catch up on Twitter. Or podcast.
  3. Avoid travelling at the same time as your students. The underground is cheaper pre-7am too. And quieter.
  4. Be careful about wearing school ID unless you want an impromptu parents consultation meeting. Or ‘banter’..
  5. You may feel like a morally superior superhero surrounded by ‘corporates’ and bankers. They won’t even look up at you.

Great books for the sceptical teacher by @oldandrewuk

Name: Andrew Old
Twitter name: oldandrewuk
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Maths
Position: Teacher
What is your advice about? Great books for the sceptical teacher.

  1. Seven Myths About Education by Daisy Christodoulou
  2. Urban Myths about Learning and Education by Pedro De Bruyckere, Paul A. Kirschner & Casper D. Hulshof
  3. Why Don’t Students Like School? by Danial T. Willingham
  4. What Every Teacher Needs to Know About Psychology by David Didau and Nick Rose
  5. Teacher Proof by Tom Bennett

Teaching international students by @sjtylr

Name: Stephen

Twitter name: @sjtylr

Sector: International Schools

Subject taught (if applicable):

Position: Teacher, Dir. Learning, IB Coordinator

What is your advice about? Teaching international students

  1. Value students’ identities by learning their real names rather than assigning English names. It’s Kyu-Min, not ‘Kenny’.
  2. Practice pronunciation of kids’ names and check with them to avoid embarrassing errors.
  3. We’re all language teachers. You will need to take more time to teach the vocabulary and conventions of your subject.
  4. Remember that humour doesn’t always translate. If in doubt, don’t.
  5. Remember that students are often in transition. New students coming part-way through the year might have missed transition support and can get left behind. Leaving students need support too.

Positive Behaviour Management by @MissMWrites

Name: May
Twitter name: @MissMWrites
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): English
Position: RQT
What is your advice about? Positive Behaviour Management

  1. Treat every class like they are your favourite until they disappoint that expectation.
  2. Create a positive relationship with parents. Call home with positive messages; this is a lift for all involved.
  3. Reward those students who consistently meet your expectations. They can become easily forgotten.
  4. Maintain consistent routines and follow through with consequences.
  5. Be flexible where necessary. You can’t win all the battles.

Behaviour by @QuantumFront

Name: Quantum Front
Twitter name: @QuantumFront
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable):
Position: Head of Faculty
What is your advice about? Behaviour

  1. Hammer Y7 for everything. It’s money in the bank.
  2. Don’t try to be cool. You’re not, they don’t care and it won’t work.
  3. Greet at the door, saying hello to everyone with a smile.
  4. Relentlessly uphold your standards. It will work, but it will also take time.
  5. Strict doesn’t mean horrible: you should phone parents to praise as well as admonish.