Phrases to use in the classroom by @rufuswilliam

Name: Rufus
Twitter name: @rufuswilliam
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Maths
Position: Lead Coach
What is your advice about? Phrases to use in the classroom

  1. “Only 3/4/5 more students to start the work.”
  2. “100% of you working hard, well done”
  3. “Show me that you’re listening.”
  4. “I know that it’s not easy or natural for you to be sitting here concentrating and working hard but I still expect it. Working hard, learning lots, and getting into good habits will have huge benefits for you in your life.”
  5. This last one is for near the beginning of every single lesson. “A reminder about my expectations: when I ask for silence I expect exactly that and when I ask you to show me that you’re listening I expect you to have nothing in your hands and to be looking at me.”
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Effective Explanations by @RufusWilliam

Name: Rufus
Twitter name: @RufusWilliam
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Maths
Position: Lead Coach
What is your advice about? How to teach

  1. Ensure all students are showing that they’re listening to you, then give clear, unambiguous explanations.
  2. Break down what you are teaching into manageable chunks. Manageable for the students that is.
  3. Model excellent work and give clear, straightforward worked examples.
  4. When introducing new concepts give examples and non-examples. That is to say, examples of what the concept is contrasted with what it isn’t.
  5. Check to see the students have taken in what you’ve said, then get them to do 20 minutes practice in silence.

Teaching A level science by @stuartteachphys

Name: Stuart Hayward
Twitter name: @stuartteachphys
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Science
Position: Teacher
What is your advice about? Teaching A level science

  1. It’s a cliche, but at the start they really are year 11s in mufti. Spend more time than you expect on routines, how to do basics and monitoring in the first term. You will make the time up later.
  2. A good overall GCSE grade can hide big gaps (especially if their GCSE includes controlled assessment). Do diagnostics on individual topics.
  3. The core / PAG practicals are not the only experiments they will need to know in the exams. Look in the specification for “describe the methods to…” statements (or similar).
  4. If you can, avoid using past paper questions for assessment the first couple of terms. Students will need to build up from paragraphs to full essays, or single calculations to full problems, and it takes time.
  5. If you are teaching physics or physical chemistry, use http://www.isaacphysics.org. It’s great.

A Level History by @grumpyteacher17

Name: The Grumpy Teacher
Twitter name: @grumpyteacher17
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): History
Position: Teacher
What is your advice about? A Level History

  1. Read about the topic you’re teaching in depth. Then read ‘around’ it – the century before, the century after, the surrounding countries.
  2. Get your pupils into the primary sources well before you try to get them answering source questions.
  3. Just ‘cos they’re in the Sixth Form doesn’t mean they’re somehow ‘above’ short factual tests. They’re not, and knowing those facts is essential, so set lots of them.
  4. The best use of a lesson is to pump the pupils full of information. And if you have to teach ’em how to take notes, teach ’em.
  5. But always try to integrate argument into lessons. History is, as Pieter Geyl memorably said, argument without end; and as almost any series of events is relevant to some argument or other it helps keep the classroom vibrant.

Effective teaching of very young boys by @iQuirky_Teacher

Name: QT
Twitter name: iQuirky_Teacher
Sector: Early Years, Primary
Subject taught (if applicable):
Position: Teacher/Subject coordinator
What is your advice about? Effective teaching of very young boys

  1. Use short commands and get straight to the point – boys prefer it to the usual softly, softly approach. Think ‘Do this…..’ not ‘Would you mind if…….’
  2. Call a spade a spade. If they’re scribbling, just tell them in a stern voice that scribbling is babyish rather than a smiley ‘Jonny, do you think Mr Fox in our class book would do that?’ They couldn’t give a shite about what Mr Fox does.
  3. Be a proper leader and gain instant respect. Boys desperately want someone to lay down the law and not let so-and-so get away with messing about while they’re trying to work hard.
  4. Know your subject (s). They can see right through your ‘Oh we’re all learners together’ bullshit, so make sure you can show how excellent you are at maths or how many science facts you have.
  5. Get the stopwatch out because everything is way more fun when it’s timed or generally competitive. ‘Who’s the best at collecting the books?’ works more than ‘Let’s all be nice and collect the books.’

Teaching A level Economics by @NickBryars

Name: Nick Bryars
Twitter name: @NickBryars
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Economcs
Position: Economics teacher
What is your advice about? Teaching A level Economics

  1. Make sure they know who is the Chancellor of Exchequer.
  2. Make sure they know what the Chancellor of the Exchequer is.
  3. Make sure they know who the Prime Minister is.
  4. Make sure they know what the Prime Minister is.
  5. Make them watch television news bulletins and, above all, read, read, read.

Lunch and After School Extra Curricular Clubs by @dominic_adam_a

Name: Dominic Amirgowhar
Twitter name: dominic_adam_a
Sector: Secondary
Subject taught (if applicable): Music
Position: Music Teacher
What is your advice about? Lunch and After School Extra Curricular Clubs

  1. Eat lunch with the pupils and chat beforehand.
  2. Have a clear idea what your session is for and what’s going to happen. Pupils know when their time is being wasted.
  3. Assign admin roles. Pupils love an element ownership of a club.
  4. Allow pupil input on the club’s future direction and have a clear end point (art show, concert, awards ceremony).
  5. Invite other teachers to join in as participants. Pupils love to see teachers grapple with the same skills and new ideas that they are.